All posts filed under: New York

Driver’s License for Expats in Kenya

I did say I’d keep posting any new tips. Here are some relating to driver’s licenses. Getting a License Okay, here, I can’t help much. The U.N. did it for us. I don’t know the process if you are not with the U.N. or an embassy. If anyone reading knows this information, please feel free to add it in via the comments section. Renewing a Kenyan License This part I know and it’s super easy. For anyone who is a resident and has an Alien ID card, you can just go online to eCitizen web site and renew it online. You fill out the form online, pay online, and print your renewal slip which you tuck into your license. However, if you have diplomatic status (e.g. are with an embassy or the U.N.) then you can’t do this. You won’t have an Alien ID card. Your license will need to go through the Foreign Ministry first. BUT…and this made my entire year…you don’t have to go through the ssslllloooooooow process at the U.N. or at …

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Working While Abroad

I’m still taking a bit of a break from work. During this time I’m thinking about how I work and would like to work. One aspect of work that keeps coming to mind is that I am very lucky that my career is portable. I can work anywhere with an internet connection, which is easy in Nairobi. Because of this, I don’t have to give put my career on hold due to geography. There are people who think that you have to be in the city that your main office is in to have a successful career. This is not the case for many professions, certainly not the case for a user experience designer. I’ve worked successfully with teams spread out all over the world, even before moving to Nairobi. I wrote about this is a recent piece on Medium and shared the tactics that worked for me. If you’re interested, you can read the article. If you have experience in this, please feel free to leave a comment. I would love to hear how other people …

The World Has Clocks…

…Africa has time. I just learned that idiom. (Shout out to my new pal, Jill, who taught me this one!) This is especially true in Kenya. We wait and wait and wait and wait…and wait. When will you be here? Just now. (A year-and-a-half in, I still don’t know what that means.) When will this be ready? I will have it ready Saturday. (That means any given Saturday) I’m learning how it all works. I’m accommodating the culture difference between me, Ms. New York Minute, and this place where time is just different. Sometimes, you have no choice but to wait it out. Traffic and things affected by traffic is a good example. Are you at the waiting room at Aga Khan? I hope you brought a good book because you’ll finish it. Sometimes, you can be explicit and set your expectations. You can state a time frame and if the person doesn’t meet the time frame, that person loses business. Yes, that’s possible here. You can indeed set a time. But, you have to …

Not Helpless Abroad

There are things you can do as an expat to fight what’s going on back in the US. Maybe you can’t call as easily. Maybe you no longer are a resident of a given state. There is still plenty you can do. You’re not helpless. Write to your representative in congress, or to the representative of your last home state or the state where you intend to return. Join the ACLU. Find a group of American expat activists. I recently did and it helps so much to gather together in this fight.  Make your voice heard on Twitter and Instagram. (It’s a wider audience than Facebook.) Look to organizations such as the Womens March and their 10 Actions 100 Days campaign for more ideas. Every ten days they post a new action we can take. The distance makes things a little harder for us, but we can still fight. Besides, at this point, what’s happening isn’t just an American issue. It’s a global crisis. Each of us, no matter where we are, can take part in this …